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VONHARRIS 05-06-11 07:09 AM

U-518 IXC
 
Patrol No 4 (8th for the crew)
September 15 1940
20:29 hours
U-518 left Wilhelmshaven with orders to patrol ET17 in Freetown and return to Lorient

September 25 1940 Grid AM76
13:05 hours Coastal freighter sunk with 1 stern torpedo

October 16 1940 Grid ET28
2 ship convoy
02:43 hours Q-ship sunk with 1 bow torpedo
03:05 hours Emprire type freighter sunk by 1 bow + 1 stern torpedoes

Convoy attack
Escorts : 1 Flower 1 Black swan 1 armed merchant cruiser
Penetrated escort screen (easily this time) and attacked at close range
6 torpedoes fired 3 hits scored
14:40 hours Small freighter sunk by 1 stern torpedo
14:42 hours Medium merchant 03 sunk by 1 bow torpedo
14:43 hours Heavy merchant 01 sunk by 1 bow torpedo after massive secondary explosions
Armed merchant cruiser missed twice by 2 bow torpedoes and 1 stern torpedo.
Escaped undamaged

November 8 1940 grid CG95
19:56 hours Armed convoy repair ship sunk with 2 bow + 2 stern torpedoes (1 stern torp was a dud)

November 9 1940 grid CG95
17:06 Aircraft attack, it came out of the sun and it was spotted when it was too late to dive. A duel begun in the calm seas: My flak gunner drove him away twice but round 3 was his : Very close miss on the std side with two bombs resulted in a destroyed diesel and the IWO and flak gunner dead by splinters. U-518 was unable to dive deep , only until periscope depth was safe.
But neither the pilot lived to tell the tale. His plane crashed due the AA fire.
Desicion : Return to Lorient following the coastline

November 10 1940 grid CG95
03:32 hours Spotted emprire type freighter : She was armed with a 3 inch stern mounted gun.
Submerged torpedo attack
The ***** took 4 torpedoes and sat on the water with no sign of listing or fire.
When tube No1 was reloaded (it looked like it took for ages staying submerged) it was fired against her. She was still there, so I decided to finish her off by gunfire - maybe not a wise move.
Range was 2500m and she took 17 105mm rounds to die. Her gunners managed to fire two rounds which led to the desicion never to engange am armed merchant again like this.

07:44 hours grid CG94
Granville type sunk by 27 105mm rounds

08:34 hours grid CG94
Medium merchant 04 sunk by 32 105mm rounds

20:38 hours grid CG85
Medium merchant 17 sunk by 19 105mm rounds
A full day of action for the the deck gun crew.

November 15 1940
06:36 hours U-518 reached Lorient with no more incidents.
62 days at sea
11 ships sunk
52498 tons
1 aircraft shot down

2 men dead

Osmium Steele 05-06-11 09:15 AM

My dear Mr. and Mrs. Kreutz,

My name is Oberleutnant s. Z. Heinz Ehlers. I had the honor of serving eleven war patrols as your son Wilhelm's commanding officer aboard two ships, U-46 and U-109.

The Kreigsmarine has already informed you of the fact of your son's death, and I would not presume to tell you of exemplary young man you knew for 17 years, but if you will indulge me, I feel an obligation to tell you of one of the finest young sailors it has ever been my priviledge to know, and what I am able of the circumstances surrounding his loss.

I first met Wilhelm in July 1939, when he was assigned to my new command, U-46. On his very first patrol, it became apparent he knew more about the operation and repair of diesel engines; in fact, all things mechanical, than anyone aboard with the possible exception of his Chief Engineer. Skills, I understand, he acquired working alongside his father at the Dusseldorf Locomotive Works.

He was a young man of exemplary character, quick wit, and was well liked by his shipmates, and highly respected by his officers. He was promoted as quickly as I could manage, commensurate with his abilites.

When I was transferred to a new command, U-109, Willy and his closest friend, Waldemar Forster, whom I understand you have met, requested transfer to U-109 as well, by-passing a chance for promotion to Bootsman. I was honored to have them both. Please know that your son was instrumental in the training of the new, young crew of U-109. I relied heavily upon him, and he never once let me, or his crewmates down.

On the night of 13 February, 1941, we had just completed an attack very near the african coast during a violent storm, confident that we could escape the patrol boats in the reduced visibility as we had so many times before.

Thirty minutes after the attack, two British destroyers converged on our position and opened fire simultaneously. Wilhelm was at his station in the engine room, both engines running at their highest revolutions. The opening salvo struck the hull outside the engine room. From what I have learned, two of the starboard engine's mounts were severed, resulting in the destruction of the engine, and a considerable amount of shrapnel in the engine room. Wilhelm, his friend Waldemar, and a new shipmate Hugo Rausch were killed.

I assure you, Wilhem did not suffer.

We eventually evaded our pursuers. When we were able to surface, a brief service was held, and the bodies of our brothers were commended to the sea, as their souls were commended into the safekeeping of our Lord and Savior. I performed the service myself.

Wilhelm always carried in his trousers a silver pocket watch, a gift from his father he told me, as well as a picture of his mother in his front shirt pocket. These items, and his Saint Nicholas necklace, were buried with him. This letter should reach you with the remainder of his personal effects.

I was very fond of your son, and I feel his loss as a crippling blow, yet I know my feelings are but a pale, mooncast shadow to your own. Please accept the sympathies of the officers and crew of the U-109. The memory of this fine young man will be kept close in our hearts until the end of days.

Sincerely,

Heinz Ehlers
Oberleutnant z. S. Kreigsmarine
U-109 Commanding

VONHARRIS 05-06-11 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Osmium Steele (Post 1658131)
The Kreigsmarine has already informed you of the fact of your son's death, and I would not presume to tell you of exemplary young man you knew for 17 years, but if you will indulge me, I feel an obligation to tell you of one of the finest young sailors it has ever been my priviledge to know, and what I am able of the circumstances surrounding his loss.

Kptlnt vonHarris and the crew of U-518 are sad about the loss of such a promising young man.

May his sacrifice won't be for nothing.

Fish In The Water 05-06-11 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Osmium Steele (Post 1658131)
The memory of this fine young man will be kept close in our hearts until the end of days.

We are saddened to hear of this loss, but rest assured - though he may be gone he is not forgotten. Thank you for your outstanding service and great sacrifice. :salute:

sublynx 05-07-11 02:10 AM

Patrol 9, U-451
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Osmium Steele (Post 1658131)
The Kreigsmarine has already informed you of the fact of your son's death

:salute:


___________________________________________
5.5.1942
Ob.Lt. z S. Erich Scheide
U-451 ("die Elster"), VIIC, 7.th Flotilla, St.Nazaire
Orders: Patrol AM77

29.4.1942, 05:17 hours. Clear, no rain, visibility 11-12 kilometers, wind 0m/s, BE35.
Spotted and sunk a 10000 BRT walfabrikschiff with two torpedoes. The ships course was 347 degrees, speed estimated to be 13 knots, but might actually have been 12 knots.
5.5.1942, 04:45 hours. Cloudy, no rain, visibility 8-9 kilometers, wind 12m/s, BE32.
Received a report of a ship sighted and sunk an American 26000 BRT passagierlinienschiff after a 150 kilometer interception run from our patrol grid at AM77. The ship was travelling behind a fully lighted hospitalship at a meager speed of 10 knots, course 92 degrees. The initial contact report was almost spot on. Decided to use a salvo of four torpedoes to make sure that the ship would not be able to use it's maximum speed of 31 knots. The ship was hit by at least 3 torpedoes, the fourth torpedo was not heard exploding nor was it's screws heard at the hydrophone. Possibly it was damaged by the explosions or it exploded simultaneously with the explosions on the ship. Since the ship was hit by so many torpedoes, it sunk in only six minutes, probably leading to a very great loss of life.

What the Americans were thinking by putting the ship in such danger, I cannot imagine. The hospital ship was lighted like a Christmas tree, so there was no trouble at spotting the passenger liner following it. And since the liner followed the hospitalship we had no hurry in estimating the liners course and speed quite precisely just by measuring the hospital ships speed and course. If the passenger liner had used even half of it's maximum speed in trying to make it to England, we would not have even been able to make the long interception run.

The crew's younger members seem to be very happy with the success, but one or two the crewmembers, who are familymen, seem to a bit shaken by the devastation we caused. That said, my estimation is that the moral on the ship is high.

5.5.1942, 08:13 hours. Cloudy, no rain, visibility 8-9 kilometers, wind 12m/s, BE32.

We are now heading back to our patrol grid with 8 torpedoes left.

Snestorm 05-07-11 02:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Osmium Steele (Post 1658131)

Sincerely,

Heinz Ehlers
Oberleutnant z. S. Kreigsmarine
U-109 Commanding

Letter writing. Very difficult part of being a superior CO.
You did it well.

Snestorm 05-07-11 02:33 AM

U519 IXC. 17.jan.43 status report.
 
Left Lorient on 12.dec.42.

Our first contact of the patrol occurred 5 days after leaving port.
At 3 minutes til midnight the call rang "Ship spotted. 123. Long range."
Destroyer! We dived and remained undected.
Our new Biscay Cross was silent. Guess he wasn't running any radar on this moonlit, calm and clear night.

We reached our assigned grid on 12.jan.43.
DP77. Just outside the NW corner of the Carribean island chains.
No contacts, surface or air.

Present position is DP55. U159 will again be taking the northern route back to Lorient.
Perhaps this time we can find a convoy, before it's escorts find us.

Snestorm 05-07-11 02:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sublynx (Post 1658671)
We are now heading back to our patrol grid with 8 torpedoes left.
[/INDENT]

Quite a haul!

sublynx 05-07-11 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1658675)
Left Lorient on 12.dec.42.
Destroyer! We dived and remained undected.
Our new Biscay Cross was silent.
---
U159 will again be taking the northern route back to Lorient.
Perhaps this time we can find a convoy, before it's escorts find us.


Gute Jagd!

I'm a bit worried about crossing the Bay of Biscay. I haven't encountered any ASW hunter groups there yet (May 1942), but it would be very dangerous to be attacked on the return trip, potentially in shallow water, maybe with a damaged sub and maybe out of torpedoes, as well.

Gerald 05-07-11 04:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1658675)
Left Lorient on 12.dec.42.

Our first contact of the patrol occurred 5 days after leaving port.
At 3 minutes til midnight the call rang "Ship spotted. 123. Long range."
Destroyer! We dived and remained undected.
Our new Biscay Cross was silent. Guess he wasn't running any radar on this moonlit, calm and clear night.

We reached our assigned grid on 12.jan.43.
DP77. Just outside the NW corner of the Carribean island chains.
No contacts, surface or air.

Present position is DP55. U159 will again be taking the northern route back to Lorient.
Perhaps this time we can find a convoy, before it's escorts find us.

Good work my,friend!

Snestorm 05-07-11 05:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sublynx (Post 1658720)
Gute Jagd!

I'm a bit worried about crossing the Bay of Biscay. I haven't encountered any ASW hunter groups there yet (May 1942), but it would be very dangerous to be attacked on the return trip, potentially in shallow water, maybe with a damaged sub and maybe out of torpedoes, as well.

Avoid BF42.

Snestorm 05-07-11 05:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vendor (Post 1658721)
Good work my,friend!

Good to see you back on this side of the forum.

Snestorm 05-08-11 05:52 AM

U159 IXC update
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1658675)
Left Lorient on 12.dec.42.

Our first contact of the patrol occurred 5 days after leaving port.
At 3 minutes til midnight the call rang "Ship spotted. 123. Long range."
Destroyer! We dived and remained undected.
Our new Biscay Cross was silent. Guess he wasn't running any radar on this moonlit, calm and clear night.

We reached our assigned grid on 12.jan.43.
DP77. Just outside the NW corner of the Carribean island chains.
No contacts, surface or air.

Present position is DP55. U159 will again be taking the northern route back to Lorient.
Perhaps this time we can find a convoy, before it's escorts find us.

23.jan.43
present position is grid DE53.

Encountered a lone fast merchant.
2 torpedoes fired. No hits.

More recently a slow convoy was encountered in DE28.
Origin determined to be New York.
Destination unknown, but presentęy headed toward Afrika on a course of 106, at 6 knots.
Escort is USN, consisting of a Fletcher Class DD, and 2 DEs.
4 attacks were made on the convoy, and 3 were succesful, resulting in the sinking of 3 tankers and 1 freighter for 40.723 GRT.
U159 suffered no damages through the engagements, and fuel reserves presently stand at 62%. Weather is presently calm & clear. 14 of 14 torpedoes expended.
Enroute to Lorient.

Gerald 05-08-11 05:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1659363)
23.jan.43
present position is grid DE53.

Encountered a lone fast merchant.
2 torpedoes fired. No hits.

More recently a slow convoy was encountered in DE28.
Origin determined to be New York.
Destination unknown, but presentęy headed toward Afrika on a course of 106, at 6 knots.
Escort is USN, consisting of a Fletcher Class DD, and 2 DEs.
4 attacks were made on the convoy, and 3 were succesful, resulting in the sinking of 3 tankers and 1 freighter for 40.723 GRT.
U159 suffered no damages through the engagements, and fuel reserves presently stand at 62%. Weather is presently calm & clear. 14 of 14 torpedoes expended.
Enroute to Lorient.

Fletcher Class DD can be a definite threat, :yep:

Snestorm 05-08-11 05:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vendor (Post 1659366)
Fletcher Class DD can be a definite threat, :yep:

Ja. My real world favorite ship class.

Gerald 05-08-11 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1659368)
Ja. My real world favorite ship class.

Great...they must be kept short.

VONHARRIS 05-08-11 07:54 AM

U-518 IXC
 
Patrol No5 (9th for the crew)
1. Changed the single 20mm for its twin version
2. Changed U-518 camouflage (IXC the wolf)
3. (U):unarmed ship

26 January 1941
06:02 hours
U-518 left Lorient for grid DT28

20 February 1941 grid CG95
16:12 hours Passenger/cargo sunk by 2 bow torpedoes

21 February 1941 grid CG95
02:21 hours Coastal freighter (U) sunk by 12 105mm rounds

05:56 hours Coastal freighter (U) sunk by 35 105mm rounds

08:09 hours Small merchant sunk by 1 bow torpedo

22 February 1941 Grid CG95
01:00 hours Emprire type freighter sunk by 1 bow + 2 stern torpedoes

09:20 hours Convoy repair ship sunk by 1 bow torpedo

14:40 hours Tramp steamer sunk by 1 bow torpedo

14:51 hours Medium cargo (U) sunk by 2 bow torpedoes and 19 105mm rounds

18:28 hours Leander class CL sunk by 3 bow torpedoes (1 missed astern)
Dido class CL missed (way off) by 2 stern torpedoes

23 February 1941 grid CG86
10:04 hours Small merchant (U) sunk by 34 105mm rounds

26 February 1941
05:18 hours
U-518 docked at Lorient
32 days at sea
10 ships sunk
37101 tons



VONHARRIS 05-08-11 12:54 PM

U-518 IXC
 
Patrol 10
(u): Unarmed ship

March 3 1941
16:51 hours
U-518 left Lorient for grid CF66

April 20 1941 Grid BF17
After over a month wondering in the Atlantic contact was made with an enemy convoy
Low to medium visibility
4 bow + 2 stern torpedoes launched
11:31 hours Passenger/cargo sunk with one bow torpedo
11:32 hours Tramp steamer sunk with 1 bow torpedo
12:10 hours Small merchant sunk with 1 bow torpedo
1 bow + 2 stern torpedoes missed
Escaped with light damages from DCs

April 27 1941 Grid BF17
Convoy spotted after BdU radio report
Bad weather , medium visibility , rain
4 bow + 2 stern torpedoes launched
08:30 hours Medium merchant 38 sunk by 1 bow torpedo
All other 5 shots were either duds or missed

Late at night an other convoy was spotted
U-518 attacked with only 2 bow torpedoes left
The weather remained the same
22:27 hours Heavy merchant sunk with 1 bow torpedo
22:29 hours Medium merchant 03 sunk with 1 bow torpedo , which was inteded for the heavy merchant but missed her.

All internal torpedoes were expended
The weather was still awful no externals could be carried inside.
Return passage to Lorient

April 30 1941
06:15 hours
Docked at Lorient in 13 m/s winds and rain.
6 ships sunk
23048 tons
34 days at sea

sublynx 05-08-11 03:51 PM

Patrol 9, U-451
 
Ob.Lt. z S. Erich Scheide
U-451 ("die Elster"), VIIC, 7.th Flotilla, St.Nazaire
Orders: Patrol AM77


7.5.1942 02:08 hours. Clear, no rain, visibility 11 - 12 kilometers, wind 1m/s. AM77 BDU radioes in a message about a convoy on a southwesterly course in grid DE34 making 10 knots an hour, 250 kilometers away. Intercept course 208 degrees, GF, intercept expected after a run of 570 kilometers.

8.5.1942 04:03 hours. Clear, no rain, visibility 11 - 12 kilometers, wind 0m/s. BE59. No convoy in sight and no radio reports on the convoy's whereabouts. I decide to head towards Gibraltar in hope that the convoy changed it's course to south. Course 170 degrees, speed HF.

8.5.1942 07:58 hours. Clear, no rain, visibility 11 - 12 kilometers, wind 0m/s. BE83. Two merchants spotted and sunk by 08:40 with five torpedoes. Course was estimated to be 0 degrees, speed 10 knots. Because the estimated course was slightly wrong, the shots had to be made at a range of 1100 meters, instead of the planned 700 meters. Out of the first salvo at an 8000 BRT American grosses frachter, one missed altogether while the other luckily hit the rudder stopping the ship. The other salvo of two torpedoes at a 4000 BRT American mittlerer frachter hit were intended. The grosses frachter was sunk by an additional torpedo at a range of 1100 meters. AOB 95, speed 0. The Mittlerer frachter sank after 18 minutes, no additional torpedoes were necessary.

After the attacks only three torpedoes were left on the boat. One was in the front compartment, one in the aft compartment and one in the back external storage. I thought that the boat didn't have enough punch for a forceful convoy attack anymore, should we meet one. No salvo shooting capability. I decided to return to St.Nazaire hoping to meet some other single merchants on the way back.

13.5.1942 08:17 hours. Cloudy, no rain, visibility 8 - 9 kilometers, 13 m/s. Back in St.Nazaire. On the way back the only sightings were own ships and one U-boat. While having a drink at the Officers' club I heard that U-518 and U-519 have had excellent patrol successes as well!

Snestorm 05-08-11 09:10 PM

U159 IXC. Patrol 3 completed
 
U159 docked at Lorient on 14.feb.43. with 4 ships sunk for 40.723 GRT.
Boat and crew are deemed healthy.
14 of 14 torpedoes expended.

U159's history to date:
3 war patrols completed between 17.apr.42 and 14.feb.43.
5 ships sunk for 52.377 GRT.


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