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gmuno 02-05-10 05:10 AM

I've to start a new career. My Type II U3 got sunk yesterday on her first war patrol at Sept. 8th, 1939. I've torpedoed a lonesome freighter east of the Firth of Forth. It sank, but 2 destroyers and 2 patrol boats closed in. One of the destroyers managed to damage engine room with a lucky throw and after that it was only a matter of time.
Well, here we go again.

Leandros 02-05-10 10:04 AM

Leutnant z. S. Paul Fischer - Patrol 1 - U-99 - March 8th 1942

Just arrived back in Lorient on my first command and with a very fresh crew. Left at March 3rd for the US East coast but hit upon a large convoy just outside Biscaya after BdU information. Too fat to let go. Was lucky with the positioning and the struggle developed into two stages. First, we were able to decimate the escorts and a couple of merchants.....




Then, after a long period of loading down reserve topedoes, we renewed the attack. Unfortunately the weather turned sour so we couldn't use the DG to finish off a couple damaged ones.









Not bad for a totally fresh crew and returned with 100% HI. Looking forward to next patrol with an even better trained crew. Even sunk an enemy submarine!






KL-alfman 02-05-10 06:55 PM

outstanding!
16ships with just 22eels!
just have to admire your achievements.

Obltn Strand 02-05-10 10:39 PM

I thought I was fast:shifty:

Leandros didn't waste any time
or fuel:salute:

Snestorm 02-05-10 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Obltn Strand (Post 1259525)
I thought I was fast:shifty:

Leandros didn't waste any time
or fuel:salute:

No. He sure doesn't play around.
Great results also!

BillCar 02-06-10 02:52 AM

The Death of U-332, the Birth of U-97
 
Oberleutnant z. S. Anton Jansen's Type VIIC (U-332) left Brest on the first of November, assigned to patrol grid CG88. Sank one coastal freighter en route to patrol grid.

Received radio message about a convoy, heading to Gibraltar. Made contact with them in rough seas three hours later – three ships were already burning. Just prior to launching torpedoes, was driven under by a Black Swan. Resurfaced and made contact again, this time picking off two tramp steamers from the back of the convoy before being forced under again. Resurfaced, made contact one last time, but was driven away.

Headed back towards CG88 and discovered another convoy. Forced under, as the seas were calm and the day bright. Detected and depth charged, forced to blow ballast to maintain station, but blew too much and popped up like a cork.

What happened next will go down in the history books.

U-332 sank, a Black Swan, a Flower corvette, and another Black Swan, all with the deck gun, and all within two minutes. By this time, all merchants in the convoy had opened fire. Went to periscope depth again and sank a passenger-cargo with the stern tubes. Severe damage, but U-332 managed to resurface and left the convoy behind, headed for Vigo to resupply.

En route to Vigo, U-332 struck another vessel in a storm. All hands were lost.

*****

Oberleutnant Theodor Winter, formerly 1 WO on U-31, has commissioned his first boat. On September 1st, 1940, while still a Leutnant, Winter left St. Nazaire in his boat, U-97, with orders to patrol grid BF13. En route, U-97 successfully damaged an attacking aircraft while suffering no damage herself.

Reaching BF13, U-97 spotted a Ceramic-type ocean liner. One torpedo fired under the keel with a magnetic pistol, but failed to detonate. Instead, U-97 used her deck gun to sink the ship, for 11,000+ GRT.

Seven hours later, U-97 picked up a merchant contact on hydrophones. Plotting a rough intercept course, she came across a medium cargo ship. One torpedo was fired with magnetic fuse, on an angle under the keel. This torpedo exploded, but proved insufficient to sink the ship. One impact pistol torpedo was fired, creating significant damage, but still not enough to sink the merchant quickly. A third torpedo, with magnetic pistol, was sent under the merchant's keel, breaking her in two for 5400 GRT.

It was only a few hours later that a second medium cargo entered U-97's patrol area. This one sank more easily, with one impact pistol to her engine room.

There followed three days of no ship sightings, and constant diving to avoid aircraft.

Finally, a small merchant was encountered by U-97. After being hit with one impact torpedo, she developed a severe list to port, but would not sink. While maneuvering, U-97 came under attack from an ASW Trawler. Forced to dive, she resurfaced to find the small merchant still traveling along her previous course, at roughly 3 knots. U-97 dispatched the small merchant with another impact torpedo.

U-97 then set course for St. Nazaire, docking on the 10th of September. Her first patrol had netted 23,619 tons of shipping, and a promotion to Oberleutnant z. See for Theodor Winter.

Leandros 02-06-10 06:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KL-alfman (Post 1259392)
outstanding!
16ships with just 22eels!
just have to admire your achievements.

Thank you! You know, the German U-boot commanders should have had a few months with SHIII before they were sent out.....:DL...

That said, I am only playing at 74 % difficulty. No need to take the work from my excellent subalterns....:hmmm:

Leandros 02-06-10 07:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BillCar (Post 1259647)
U-332 sank, a Black Swan, a Flower corvette, and another Black Swan, all with the deck gun, and all within two minutes. By this time, all merchants in the convoy had opened fire.

Boy, oh boy - this is certainly something for the history books. Particularly when one considers that all those surface vessels must have been simultaneously within artillery range of your boot....and at 100%.....!!!

BillCar 02-06-10 10:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leandros (Post 1259770)
Boy, oh boy - this is certainly something for the history books. Particularly when one considers that all those surface vessels must have been simultaneously within artillery range of your boot....and at 100%.....!!!

It was very, very strange. The merchants couldn't find my range, but the Flower and second Black Swan each hit me once. I was playing on 100% with GWX 3.0 and a bunch of realism mods. Guess I was just lucky?

Lucky until my boat was destroyed by a collision, at least!

Submarine 02-06-10 11:27 AM

My new ship is setting out of harbor and headed to the English channel at coordinates AN13 for patrol. Wish me luck, its my first time playing SHIII in a long time :D

Leandros 02-06-10 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BillCar (Post 1259870)
It was very, very strange. The merchants couldn't find my range, but the Flower and second Black Swan each hit me once. I was playing on 100% with GWX 3.0 and a bunch of realism mods. Guess I was just lucky?

Lucky until my boat was destroyed by a collision, at least!

You must have been extremely lucky. Don't try it again.....:woot:....

Leandros 02-06-10 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Submarine (Post 1259933)
My new ship is setting out of harbor and headed to the English channel at coordinates AN13 for patrol. Wish me luck, its my first time playing SHIII in a long time :D

Hals und Beinbruch..!

Submarine 02-06-10 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leandros (Post 1259949)
Hals und Beinbruch..!

Was off the coast of portland, UK encountered a UK destroyer and engaged. Was hit with 2 depth charges but I repaired the damage quick. Missed with all my torpedoes, then surfaced for a last stand with my deck gun. After scoring a few direct hits, the destroyer rammed me and my poor U-boat was lost to the sea. Well it was a good practice run to warm up anyway :D

KL-alfman 02-06-10 03:25 PM

after a long and successful patrol (72days, 10ships sunk, 73k tons) U-110 could manage to reach Lorient in the morning of Dec, 24th 1941.

now as Kaleu Artur Stein was preparing for the next patrol he had to realize that BdU was sending him to DJ13, again Gibraltar! and he was so looking forward to be sent to the east-coast of the U.S. - so there now is a big deal of disappointment he has to hide from his crew.
just thinking of his lazy elephant-type-IXB evading constant air-attacks makes him sick .....
but orders are orders. :cry:

Submarine 02-06-10 03:40 PM

Started a new patrol in 1939 as the 1st squadron with my little IIB. After patrolling for a few days at sea, and reaching out patrol point we encountered a UK destroyer at medium to long range. After launching 2 torpedos, one lucky hit struck the destroyer in the engine room causing her to take on water and sink to the sea. I think I should end the patrol and refill my torps but I do not know. My little boat carries just about none.

Anyway! That is my first confirmed kill since I returned to SHIII and subsim after a few months hiatus! WOOHOO! PARTY!! :rock:

Leandros 02-06-10 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KL-alfman (Post 1260133)
after a long and successful patrol (72days, 10ships sunk, 73k tons) U-110 could manage to reach Lorient in the morning of Dec, 24th 1941.

now as Kaleu Artur Stein was preparing for the next patrol he had to realize that BdU was sending him to DJ13, again Gibraltar! and he was so looking forward to be sent to the east-coast of the U.S. - so there now is a big deal of disappointment he has to hide from his crew.
just thinking of his lazy elephant-type-IXB evading constant air-attacks makes him sick .....
but orders are orders. :cry:

Good thing you made it back to Xmas eve.....:)....think of all those others that didn't.....

KL-alfman 02-06-10 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leandros (Post 1260208)
Good thing you made it back to Xmas eve.....:)....think of all those others that didn't.....


absolutely right!
btw, we sent a radio message before arriving and so a JU52 was waiting for the crew to take them home to their families. :salute:

BillCar 02-06-10 08:07 PM

U-97, TypeVIIC, Oberleutnant z. See Theodor Winter
Patrol II
Left St. Nazaire for AM51. Sank one Granville freighter with deck gun for ca. 4000 tons.

On reaching AM51, received report of enemy large convoy making 4 knots on an easterly course. Moved to intercept in 15 metre seas.

Spotted lead escort at 20:15. Ran decks awash in already-high seas, at roughly 3 knots. At 4000 metres from the escort, U-97 dove to periscope depth and ran silent.

U-97 was running parallel to the convoy at this point, directly between the two centre columns. As the merchants made their ways to 45 and 315 degrees of relative bearing, U-97 executed a right angle turn, and waited.

To the stern, a passenger-cargo was passing. In front of U-97, two medium cargo ships were visible. The closest was engaged with two Type II torpedoes on impact setting. Immediately afterwards, a Type I was sent from the stern tubes towards the passenger-cargo on a fast setting.

Oblt. Winter was giving firing data to the weapons officer when the passenger-cargo exploded, sinking almost instantly. Four seconds after the explosion, two Type I torpedoes on impact setting were launched at the second medium cargo. While they were en route to their target, the first medium cargo caught the two Type IIs and sank.

One Type I impacted the second medium cargo, holing it under the bridge. The second never detonated.

At no point was U-97 directly engaged by escorts, as they had no clue where she was.

Surfacing half an hour later, U-97 overhauled the convoy at flank speed to attack from the side before dawn broke. Spotted by a destroyer, U-97 turned into the convoy early and, still at flank speed, fired four more torpedoes, sinking a large merchant and damaging a tanker. U-97 dove at flank with the destroyer almost directly above her, but took no damage from the depth charges. She dropped to 210 metres and turned west, directly out the backtrack of the convoy. Evaded for a mere 20 minutes, then surfaced, headed for St. Nazaire.

Encountered a lone passenger-cargo, which was torpedoed from periscope depth at a distance of roughly 4km with a fast-moving Type I torpedo. Oddly, this kill was not recorded in the ship's log. Possible neutral vessel.

Finally, a lone small merchant was overhauled by U-97 and, the seas being calm, was sunk with the deck gun.

Total patrol tonnage: roughly 28,000 GRT (over 30,000 if counting the possible neutral passenger-cargo), making for a career total of roughly 60,000 tons in two patrols for Oblt. Winter.

EDIT:
U-97, TypeVIIC, Oberleutnant z. See Theodor Winter
Patrol II
Left St. Nazaire for AM51. Sank one Granville freighter with deck gun for ca. 4000 tons.

On reaching AM51, received report of enemy large convoy making 4 knots on an easterly course. Moved to intercept in 15 metre seas.

Spotted lead escort at 20:15. Ran decks awash in already-high seas, at roughly 3 knots. At 4000 metres from the escort, U-97 dove to periscope depth and ran silent.

U-97 was running parallel to the convoy at this point, directly between the two centre columns. As the merchants made their ways to 45 and 315 degrees of relative bearing, U-97 executed a right angle turn, and waited.

To the stern, a passenger-cargo was passing. In front of U-97, two medium cargo ships were visible. The closest was engaged with two Type II torpedoes on impact setting. Immediately afterwards, a Type I was sent from the stern tubes towards the passenger-cargo on a fast setting.

Oblt. Winter was giving firing data to the weapons officer when the passenger-cargo exploded, sinking almost instantly. Four seconds after the explosion, two Type I torpedoes on impact setting were launched at the second medium cargo. While they were en route to their target, the first medium cargo caught the two Type IIs and sank.

One Type I impacted the second medium cargo, holing it under the bridge. The second never detonated.

At no point was U-97 directly engaged by escorts, as they had no clue where she was.

Surfacing half an hour later, U-97 overhauled the convoy at flank speed to attack from the side before dawn broke. Spotted by a destroyer, U-97 turned into the convoy early and, still at flank speed, fired four more torpedoes, sinking a large merchant and damaging a tanker. U-97 dove at flank with the destroyer almost directly above her, but took no damage from the depth charges. She dropped to 210 metres and turned west, directly out the backtrack of the convoy. Evaded for a mere 20 minutes, then surfaced, headed for St. Nazaire.

Encountered a lone passenger-cargo, which was torpedoed from periscope depth at a distance of roughly 4km with a fast-moving Type I torpedo. Oddly, this kill was not recorded in the ship's log. Possible neutral vessel.

Finally, a lone small merchant was overhauled by U-97 and, the seas being calm, was sunk with the deck gun.

Total patrol tonnage: roughly 28,000 GRT (over 30,000 if counting the possible neutral passenger-cargo), making for a career total of roughly 60,000 tons in two patrols for Oblt. Winter.

Patrol 3 (Final Patrol)
U-97 left St. Nazaire for AM41 on 1st November. Encountered one Empire-class, which was sunk with one magnetic torpedo under her keel.

U-97 encountered 8 metre seas and thick fog for the duration of her patrol of AM41, and these conditions continued after she left the apparently-empty AM41 grid to patrol AM51. It was here that she received orders to intercept an SC convoy making roughly 3 knots. Overhauling the convoy, U-97 approached from the front in very heavy fog which limited visibility to roughly 3 kilometres.

U-97 made a surface attack with decks awash, commencing at 02:07 on November 11th, 1940. Four torpedoes were fired, with hits on a large cargo and medium cargo. As these hits were on the far side of the convoy, and searchlights were only visible at that great distance, U-97 assumed it safe to press home an attack on a small merchant 1800 metres to her 160. As she began her turn, the merchant suddenly snapped on her spotlight, fixing U-97 within a second.

No more than two seconds after this, U-97 came under extremely focused fire the likes of which are rarely seen. This fire came from an unseen source, but was instantly devastating, with four shell impacts in the space of three seconds. The first shell hit the conning tower, killing the WO and one petty officer outright.

Oblt. Winter ordered a crash dive and had the damage control team (led by CE Bergmann) do an immediate assessment. U-97 continued to sustain hits from shellfire as she dove, and it became apparent that no compartment had escaped severe damage. CE Bergmann declared all compartments to be condition red, with heavy flooding. As his team worked in the bow quarters to stem the rapid flooding, an explosion claimed the lives of CE Bergmann, his seven-man team, and six other seamen who were also in the compartment.

The boat continued to sink out of control, breaking up at 138 metres at 02:14, less than one minute after the first shell hit her conning tower. Oblt. Winter and all hands were lost....

Which sucked, because this was my favourite and most immediately-successful career so far. :(

lynard 02-08-10 03:03 AM

Installed GWX a couple of weeks ago and can't leave it alone. In a word "BRILLIANT".
Nearly completed patrol 12 - October 1940 V11B.
I seem to be running into convoys all over the place. Managed to spot a battleship in the middle of one but the escorts were too good. Kept me down until there was no chance to catch up.
AM 46 - 21 Oct
Hydrophones picked up what only can be large convoy closing. Managed to get into position for a 90 attack and shut everything down. Careful periscope work shows position looks good, inside the port column. Bloody hell! in too close the lead destroyer scoots past no more than 100m away. Everybody starts to breathe again. Spotted a cruiser in the middle column. Had to sneak slow astern to get distance. Set up a full spread and fired. Calculations were a bit off. Managed to get one hit right on the bow but it was enough.
We copped a pounding from 3 destroyers, and they were good. Batteries were nearly flat, air was foul and the crew were exhausted before we managed to sneak away.
Dido class 5600 tons
Have since sunk
2 empire freighters
1 large cargo
1 ore carrier
34439 tons
Have taken quite a bit of damage so far and with only 2 stern fish left have decided to head for home.

BillCar 02-08-10 03:21 AM

In the wake of U-97's destruction in 1940, I started a new career in September, 1939.

U-53 is a Type VIIB attached to Saltzwedel Flotilla.
Leutnant z. S. Jochen Lbke is her commander.

Departed Wilhelmshaven on September 2nd, 1939, with orders to patrol AM32. While traversing the North Sea, U-53 twice came under air attack, both times driving off the offending aircraft with flak (though U-53 did not succeed in destroying the aircraft).

The rest of the trip to AM32 was uneventful, but on reaching AM32 on September 7th, U-53 encountered a coastal freighter. The first Type I was a dud, but the second holed the freighter in her stern, and she sank within minutes. Later that same day, a small merchant was sunk with a single torpedo.

The remainder of the AM32 patrol was uneventful. U-53 opted to hunt AM51, off the northwest coast of Ireland. While there on September 12th, she sank a passenger cargo with a single torpedo, bringing her total haul to roughly 6000 tons.

Two days later, off the southwest of Ireland, U-53 surprised a Granville freighter, sinking her with a single torpedo amidships, and increasing her first patrol bag to roughly 10,000 tons.

U-53 then headed to BF13, and ran a search pattern that turned up a small merchant on September 17th. U-53 overhauled her, sinking her with a single torpedo amidships. Immediately afterwards, another merchant vessel was caught and torpedoed by U-53. Though she was only a small merchant, she took two torpedoes to sink, despite developing a severe list after the first one.

On the morning of the 18th, another coastal freighter was caught and torpedoed by U-53. With only two torpedoes left, she made for home, plotting a course through the English Channel. Later that afternoon, U-53 caught a large cargo ship, sinking it with a magnetic torpedo on a fast-running Type I, after having missed her first shot.

Heading through the channel was strenuous, but U-53 made it through undetected. Proceeding at flank speed on the surface when no ships were visible, she would dive and run silent for hours on end when one appeared. Through this method, she made it out of the channel and then ran at flank speed all the way home, arriving on September 22nd after 20 days at sea. Her total haul was in excess of 28,000 GRT.


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