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YukonJack_AK 03-12-2010 06:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frau kaleun (Post 1308724)
I just wish I could find some warships to sink! I get contact reports and occasionally one shows up on the hydrophones, but always too far away and going too fast in the wrong direction for me to catch up to.

Had the same problem... Found by sheer chance a wonderful place to hunt the "Big Boys". The deep water just west of the Straits of Gibraltar is the place to go as it's a major choke point for all traffic coming and going from the Med. I simply murder them there!:D I will spend several days just patroling in a circle there and LOTS of convoys come through for starters, but every so often a TF comes through with a truely juicy target or two! :arrgh!:

http://img651.imageshack.us/img651/8...oneflattop.jpg

Thats the HMS Arc Royal going "bottoms up" after taking 4 to the front quarter! Unfortunately couldn't reload fast enough for the BB there and the 6 tin can escorts sent me deep to hide... but man that was awesome! :rock: I love getting Patrol Orders that send me South - I never miss an opportunity to stop by the Straits!

Paul Riley 03-12-2010 06:15 AM

Look forward to heading down there sometime in my career ,good screenshot :yeah:
I used to enjoy that spot in the stock game,but using GWX3 I expect the area to be even more interesting.
Its always a shame to see one of Britain's finest battleships in such peril though :nope:;)

YukonJack_AK 03-12-2010 06:19 AM

Just watch out once you've had a few go down... I swear the AI comes looking for the pest at the back door. :arrgh!: I've noticed pairs of ASW Tugs, DD's and heavier air cover intently looking for me after a few good sinkings... GWX IS GREAT!!! :rock:

Paul Riley 03-12-2010 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YukonJack_AK (Post 1310276)
... GWX IS GREAT!!! :rock:

Amen to that.

Grim Nigel 03-12-2010 07:17 AM

Retiring my current carreer after 6 patrols.

Just discovered I shouldnt even have the radar detector or decoys yet! Not entirely sure how I managed to get them. I suspect a previous mod I was test driving had changed equipment availability dates.

Kinda feels like cheating so I'm going to start a new career :DL

Paul Riley 03-12-2010 07:28 AM

I wouldnt retire just because of that mate,if it bothers you that much why not remove the radio man from his post?,it may disable the equipment for a time? :hmmm:
I certainly wouldnt retire,I would consider it a gift from the gods.
Still,I can see what you mean though from YOUR perspective,it would give you an advantage where in real life you wouldnt have that luxury?,at least not yet.

Grim Nigel 03-12-2010 07:53 AM

I'd already deleted the career when I suddenly realisted I could of edited the equipment out in the config file lol.
Doesnt matter though, I'd already earned promotions and iron crosses second and first class so I think my captain would of been "requested" to volunteer for training instructor duty, he was one hell of a lucky chap. Lets hope U-707 shares some of that luck as well :yeah:

Paul Riley 03-12-2010 08:25 AM

Well,good luck with U-707 :)

Gilbou 03-12-2010 08:30 AM

Playing with all realism options set except map contacts (I like to draw interception things and etc. but I have to have to keep drawing where the ship is once spotted.) and I also have manual targetting off (tried once, ended in 1944 still with my type-II and almost 95 % of patrols without ever sinking anything).

type IIA
March 1940
Done 7 patrols, 8th underway
Started with 500 renown, actually got 1000
Trying to reach 2500 for a type VIIB

Writing my patrols logs in the blog in my signature.

Pappy55 03-12-2010 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YukonJack_AK (Post 1310276)
Just watch out once you've had a few go down... I swear the AI comes looking for the pest at the back door. :arrgh!: I've noticed pairs of ASW Tugs, DD's and heavier air cover intently looking for me after a few good sinkings... GWX IS GREAT!!! :rock:

I might take my sub down there after my 24 hours are up in this area.. I have not found much so far..

To be honest I have never spotted a capitol ship in a campaign ever in sh3. I spotted a cruise liner in the stock game once and sunk her but thats about it.

So here's hopeing.. Will make a great christmas present (currently late nov 39) to the crew

Paul Riley 03-12-2010 09:40 AM

Strait of Gibraltar (more so inside and on towards the Med) was/still is a hive of activity,it was once a major trade hub for the British Empire and I reckon some very juicy targets could be found there,if one is brave and skillful enough to cope with the increased patrol craft in that area.
I wonder how GWX3 simulated this area?,only time will tell :arrgh!: *NO SPOILERS PLEASE*

frau kaleun 03-12-2010 03:15 PM

Patrol 5

U-35, 2 U-Boat Flotilla Saltzwedel
ObltzS Peter Schmidt, Commander

January 14, 1940, 02:42
Departed: Wilhelmshaven
Mission Orders: Patrol grid BE59

January 17, 1940, 15:08
Grid AN 14
Ship sunk: MV Agate (Small Trawler), 98 tons
Crew: 23
Crew lost: 18

January 18, 1940, 09:38
Grid AN 13
Ship sunk: SS Bradfyne (Granville-type Freighter), 4707 tons
Cargo: Paper Products
Crew: 84
Crew lost: 62

January 18, 1940, 11:32
Grid AN 13
Ship sunk: MV Chestnut (Small Trawler), 99 tons
Crew: 13
Crew lost: 2

January 18, 1940, 18:14
Grid AN 13
Ship sunk: MV Crista (Small Merchant), 2229 tons
Cargo: Mail/Packages
Crew: 27
Crew lost: 11

January 20, 1940, 11:40
Grid AM 35
Ship sunk: HMS Ashanti (Tribal class), 1850 tons
Crew: 191
Crew lost: 1

January 22, 1940, 09:57
Grid AM 39
Ship sunk: HMS Woolston (V&W class), 1188 tons
Crew: 104
Crew lost: 4

January 24, 1940, 03:55
Grid AM 51
Ship sunk: SS Sea Tarpon (Large Cargo), 6897 tons
Cargo: Phosphates
Crew: 51
Crew lost: 15

January 24, 1940, 04:01
Grid AM 51
Ship sunk: SS Grafton (Large Cargo), 6898 tons
Cargo: Tobacco
Crew: 55
Crew lost: 26

January 24, 1940, 18:15
Grid AM 46
Ship sunk: SS Adrian (Coastal Freighter), 1873 tons
Cargo: General Cargo
Crew: 21
Crew lost: 12

January 25, 1940, 00:37
Grid AM 49
Ship sunk: SS Port Adelaide (Ore Carrier), 6449 tons
Cargo: Coal
Crew: 67
Crew lost: 32

January 26, 1940, 19:06
Grid BE 35
Ship sunk: SS Thistleglen (Granville-type Freighter), 4709 tons
Cargo: Military Vehicles
Crew: 105
Crew lost: 23

February 8, 1840, 11:48
Returned: Wilhelmshaven
Crew losses: 0
Ships sunk: 11
Aircraft destroyed: 0
Merchant tonnage: 33959 tons
Warship tonnage: 3038 tons
Patrol tonnage: 36997 tons
Career Tonnage: 120484

On return to base I was awarded the Iron Cross, First Class as was my veteran Mechanikerhauptgefreiter, Johann-Walter Lind. The Iron Cross, Second Class was awarded to my 1WO, LtzS Kurt Myke, and to Mechanikermaat Willibald Mühlhaber. Funkmaat Gunter Domke and Sanitätsmaat Wilhelm Honsberg were both promoted from Bootsmann to Stabsbootsmann.

I think I'm officially addicted now, as the thrill of bagging my first warships led to an all-nighter. Fortunately I can afford the loss of sleep today as I'd taken the whole week off work! (Actually it's probably a good thing, I've been sleeping in all week and have to be up early tomorrow for a very long day - so I need to be dead tired tonight in order to get to sleep early.)

Anyway, the determination to stay up and continue the patrol paid off as I hadn't proceeded too far south and west after sinking the second destroyer when I got a report of a large convoy heading ENE towards the upper Western Approaches. Turned north for grid AM51 and was able to intercept at the front starboard corner of the four-column procession; a combination of darkness, rough seas and silent running at periscope depth allowed me to sneak in behind the Swan class patrolling ahead of the merchants and slip into position between the two nearest columns. At least two other escorts were patrolling at the rear of the formation, leaving the flanks largely unprotected.

I had my eye on the third ships in the two middle columns, the two biggest ships in the convoy. I set up a fast two eel spread for each; fired on the first one from about 1800m out, and the second from maybe 2300m; honestly I'm not sure because my nerves were so on edge! Trying to keep track of the two ships I was after; trying to keep track of all the other unsuspecting merchants as they sailed ever closer to pass fore and aft of us; trying to follow the movements of the head escort from the whispers being passed up from the hydrophone station; nerve-wracking, I tell you, absolutely nerve-wracking! But OMG the adrenalin!

But I got off all four torpedoes and all four hit, two per ship, as I ordered an immediate dive, then hard to port, and quickly lowered the 'scope. It seemed like only seconds later that we heard the distinct sounds of both merchants sinking into the abyss. Set course WSW, and off we went, dropping deeper and deeper as we slid through the water beneath the rest of the oncoming convoy. By the time they'd all passed over and around us, we were at 150m; the lead escort had given up looking for us, and the ones who stayed behind to patrol the area never even came close to guessing our location. Eventually they had to return to the flock and we were clear to resurface with almost 14000 tons of unlucky English shipping added to our tally.

We returned to base with one lonely torpedo sitting patiently in the stern tube, having saved that and one in the fore tubes for our journey home, during which we'd been ordered to patrol just east of Scapa Flow for 24 hours if our fuel reserves were sufficient. They were, but the weather refused to cooperate. A fierce winter storm lashed at our little boat all the way through the Nordsee, and visibility was almost nonexistent; so much so that we couldn't make out the ships of a large convoy moving through the area despite the hydrophone reports that indicated they were almost right on top of us. At the time we still had the one eel waiting in a fore tube, but with only that and the stern tube available, going up against an escorted convoy with barely 100m beneath our keel and less than 2000m visibility seemed like a very foolhardy undertaking, so we reported the contact, dropped to 80m and ran silent out of there.

We did come across a lone coastal freighter several hours later, and fired off a shot from a fore tube that just missed her bow as she turned away from its trajectory. Whether she somehow managed to spot our 'scope in the waves, or was simply getting bounced around too much in the storm to keep a steady course and depth, I'm not sure. Heaven knows it was all we could do to stay on course on the surface.

By the time we returned to base the wind had died down somewhat, but the cold rain persisted with a vengeance. Nevertheless, a highly successful patrol from which all hands returned happy and healthy.

And, yeah, I think I better turn up the realism a notch, since I'd like to be promoted to Kptl before my luck runs out. :O:

Gilbou 03-12-2010 03:23 PM

Just sailed out.
Came back on 8th patrol with type IIA U-22
on April, 9th 1940

Ordered in December, 15h 1937, the U-99
was laid down March, 31th 1939. After
tests, she was commissioned April, 18th 1940

Took command of the U-99 type VIIB on
April, 10th 1940, moved with crew to
Willemshaven on 11th and took control of
U-99 on 22th 1940 at 06:00

Sailed with U-99 to Kiel, got her fitted with
type II torpedoes.

Departed for 9th patrol and U-99 first patrol,
brand new ship, April 23th 1940 at 06:45

U-22 was transfered to another command
and left for her patrol a week ago. Bdu
sent us a message on April, 25th 1940 at
08:02 to inform us U-22 failed to report
and came back from patrol. I left U-22
for U-99, U-22 went to sea for her first
patrol without me and she will never come
back...

frau kaleun 03-12-2010 03:26 PM

:wah: Ouch man that's gotta hurt.

RIP, U-22.

Gilbou 03-12-2010 03:32 PM

The radio message was a slap in the face.

Spent two years with the U-22, from 1st august 1939 (one month before the war even started !) to April, 9th 1940

Done 8 patrols with her, sending to the bottom of sea 30283 tons.

I took the U-99, sailed outside of the Kiel kanal and the message announcing the loss of U-22 reached me.

:wah:


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