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Leandros 06-22-09 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meduza (Post 1121822)
I think you are doomed. :dead:
There's one thing I would try before raising the white flag: shoot at DDs using hydrophones to aim. Magnetic detonators to avoid hitting at some obscure angle, if you know their drafts. But this probably wouldn't work because they are pretty close, judging by the screenshot, and the eels may not arm. :hmmm:

I wouldn't have gone into a discussion with you about that! However....

03:25

They are giving up and heading west - that's approx. 15 hours of hunting - 7 destroyers...




Nothing special about it, just creeped away at 1 kts., the swelling obviously helped and they almost run into each other all the time. Now we need to repair and try to find HMS Nelson - we haven't got the credit.


09:25

Returning to base. Periscopes are not repairable. If we get back in one piece I shall ask for transfer to IXB


meduza 06-22-09 02:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leandros (Post 1121831)

09:25

Returning to base. Periscopes are not repairable. If we get back in one piece I shall ask for transfer to IXB


I wouldn't let damaged Nelson get away. :DL Attack at night. If you slowed her down, she's probably unescorted.

Leandros 06-22-09 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meduza (Post 1121877)
I wouldn't let damaged Nelson get away. :DL Attack at night. If you slowed her down, she's probably unescorted.

Well, she needed to be found first and the place was crawling with Tribals. We had two pass us when on our way out the Vestfjord. Decided to play it safe - the Jimbuna doctrine....:03:.....not sure we should have attacked her in the first place under those circumstances and with that kind of escort...I mean, we are not expected to commit suicide...or are we..?

meduza 06-22-09 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leandros (Post 1121885)
I mean, we are not expected to commit suicide...or are we..?

Err... no... :hmmm:... I guess...

:D

grislyatoms 06-22-09 03:30 PM

I think we have pushed our luck enough in the shallows of the Channel. Our trip through was good for a hair over 20,000 tons, so morale is pretty good.

Heading out to BE31, midway between Land's End and Brest. A little chop, fresh breeze. 9 torpedoes left.

Shaping up to be a good patrol.

Leandros 06-22-09 04:12 PM

Kaleu Georg Eckhardt - U-122 July 12th. 1940 04:15 - patrol 7

Have transferred to a IXB - shining new from the wharf. Left Wilhelmshafen on July 6th for grid AN24. After having patrolled the assigned grid proceeded through the sound between the Orkneys and Shetland to a position West Scapa/North of Scotland. 3 merchants for 18.000 tons so far.

We have just sighted 2 auxilliary cruisers escorted by a V&W on a North-Westerly course and have been able to position us fairly well.....





A little later - 2 torps fired on ea. of the Aux. cruisers. 2 TII on impact on number one and 2 TI on impact towards the second. One of the TII's prematured, the other hit. Fired off the two later ones a little too late so the second Aux. cruiser was warned by the hit on the first one and started veering. Both passed in front of him.

Well then, the V&V turned against us and we marked our position by going flank. Turned against him and he could not follow us in the turn. Fired one from the rear tube at 450 meters, a TI on magnetic. It hit him in his aft part - blaaammm. And then, blaaammm went the computer - black! Well, that was that! I saved a little before so I shall start up again from there.

But not tonight.....
THIS IS TOTALLY RIDICULOUS...!!!

Restarted the game and soon acquired the two aux cruisers and their V&W escort (We were lying beside a burning and sinking tramp steamer). The V&W approached the area cautiously, we had him approx. 30 degrees off our port bow when a TI on magnetic was sent off - distance 650 meters. Just before it hit he started veering towards starboard but too late. It went off under his aft. Then - again - blaaammm went the computer. Black.... What is this....?????


OK, will do it differently now.....hide by the burning tramp steamer, take out the Aux Cruisers first, and - not watch the explosions in the scope. See how it works out. Obviously my computer has some sort of overload problem.


That worked!


Kaleu Georg Eckhardt - U-122 July 12th. 1940 03:05 - patrol 7





Still 12 torps left.


Kaleu Georg Eckhardt - U-122 July 12th. 1940 05:06 - patrol 7


Fresh air, full batteries, torpedoes downloaded....ready to go..

Is this war....?....



Leandros 06-23-09 12:13 PM

Kaleu Georg Eckhardt - U-122 July 18th. 1940 12:00 - patrol 7

After having sunk the two aux. cruisers North of Scotland was ordered to proceed to Gibraltar in connection with the British attack on French warships in Oran and Alger.

Encountered a large convoy and a couple of loners enroute and spent all torpedoes. In all, a good first patrol for a new boat with a somewhat reduced crew. (The real U-122 was lost on its first patrol).

Have called on Lorient to replenish - was advised at sea that it was available.


PATROL REPORT



DaveU186 06-23-09 04:24 PM

U-2458 - Returned from 4th Patrol - 28th January 1940
Once again found ourselves posted near Gibraltar, but only returned home with around half of the haul we'd managed in the previous two trips, despite encountering convoys for the first time since our maiden patrol.

We bagged an Empire-Freighter NW of Ireland and the next morning a Medium Cargo entering from South of Ireland, then bumped into an escort where we sunk another Empire and an Ore Carrier, but were detected due to carelessness, and had to go to 160m to sneak away.

A bit of fun was had after being detected trying to approach a convoy West or Gibraltar, though. Being pursued by two Black Swans, up went the snorkel and they couldn't keep pace. After opening up quite some distance between us, we crash dived and went silent, and they soon turned back.

Rolled back into Wilhelmshaven with 38,000 tonnes to our name.

PavelKirilovich 06-24-09 06:40 AM

I've been keeping an (improperly formatted) patrol log by hand while transiting to-and-fro, gives me something to do while waiting for action to crop up in SH3 on those long South Atlantic patrols. Two patrols covered thus far; entries from the second patrol covered (this career's 26th) are as follows. Sorry lads, no screenshots.

Briefing:
U-180 is to depart Lorient at 14h15 and proceed to GH21 where she will conduct patrol operations for 24 hours. Upon completion of patrol assignment, U-180 is authorised to act independently according to existing rules of engagement.

Entry I:
7 March 1943. 14h20. BF61.
U-180 cast off at 14h17. Despite the IXD2's size, she handles well in the restricted passages of the harbour. Crew noted excellent turn out on docks for this patrol, many fraueleins.
Note: The boat cleared harbour at 15h30 precisely.

Entry II:
7 March 1943. 19h55. In the vicinity of BF61.
RAF Coastal Command attacked U-180 as the boat was transiting the Bay of Biscay. Twin-engine aircraft of some description equipped with surface search radar and depth bombs. Poor radar discipline displayed; as they left the set on while coming to attack distance, providing U-180 with plenty of time to escape. RWR worked very well, detecting the target early on and providing an excellent azimuth. Antiaircraft ambush may be possible using the accuracy of the RWR's azimuth-finding technique*, though this tactic is not wise. U-180 dove to 25 metres in plenty of time to evade the RAF aircraft. Numerous wabos dropped on enemy's last datum of U-180, more than 200 metres astern of the boat. Periscope check before resurfacing showed twin-engine aircraft disappearing into the distance. Waited two more hours before resurfacing at 19h50.

Entry III:
27 March 1943. 08h50. GH54.
At roughly 07h00, U-180 encountered a single English merchantman on the horizon bearing 057, course north-west, range approximately 17.5 kilometres. This distance was very rapidly closed on the surface, the intent being to attack with the deck gun so as to conserve torpedoes, resulting in the enemy opening fire at a range of 9000 metres with one naval rifle of unknown calibre located in "A" position on the vessel. Some salvoes were quite accurate, efficiently bracketing U-180, though no hits were scored. It seems a handful of near misses was the best the merchant crew could manage; though the Kaleun refused to make it easy for the enemy gunners by running a straight course. Fire was opened from 105mm gun at 4000 metres, aiming for waterline. At 2500 metres, the enemy's gun was knocked out of action with one round. Shortly thereafter the target caught fire from bowsprit to fantail and began sinking on an even keel. 36 rounds expended total. Only three rounds missed. Matrosengefreiters K. Zorn, H. Balke, and H. Schubert are to be commended for excellent gunnery. Estimated 8575 GRT added to logbook. Estimate twelve survivors. Water provided, their location radioed 'in the clear' on international aid frequencies.** Best of luck to them. H. Schubert is recommended for the Iron Cross (1 Klasse) for his achievement in knocking out the enemy's gun with a single round while under intense enemy fire.

--

* - Modern RWRs cannot provide such a fine azimuth without multiple readings and networking of the RWRs in order to provide triangulation on the emitting source. However, I have no desire for GWX to fix this, though if they were going to a 15-degree or even thirty-degree fuzzy arc replacing the thick black line pointing in the direction of the emitter would be accurate to the era.

** - I have the excellent lifeboat mod installed. I sometimes feel bad for sinking my countrymen flying under the Red Ensign, particularly if I have cause to think they're Canadian, and therefore will surface and sail past survivors to "render assistance" if the tactical situation permits. I simulate the assistance calls by sending a radio report to BdU; I understand the AI has excellent radio direction finding capabilities, which means that quite realistically I then "sprint" away from the contact site and be on the alert for enemy aircraft thereafter. Though, the long-living crews are always on the alert for maritime patrol birds.

Leandros 06-24-09 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PavelKirilovich (Post 1122713)
I've been keeping an (improperly formatted) patrol log by hand while transiting to-and-fro, gives me something to do while waiting for action to crop up in SH3 on those long South Atlantic patrols. Two patrols covered thus far; entries from the second patrol covered (this career's 26th) are as follows. Sorry lads, no screenshots.

Briefing:
U-180 is to depart Lorient at 14h15 and proceed to GH21 where she will conduct patrol operations for 24 hours. Upon completion of patrol assignment, U-180 is authorised to act independently according to existing rules of engagement.

Entry I:
7 March 1943. 14h20. BF61.
U-180 cast off at 14h17. Despite the IXD2's size, she handles well in the restricted passages of the harbour. Crew noted excellent turn out on docks for this patrol, many fraueleins.
Note: The boat cleared harbour at 15h30 precisely.

Entry II:
7 March 1943. 19h55. In the vicinity of BF61.
RAF Coastal Command attacked U-180 as the boat was transiting the Bay of Biscay. Twin-engine aircraft of some description equipped with surface search radar and depth bombs. Poor radar discipline displayed; as they left the set on while coming to attack distance, providing U-180 with plenty of time to escape. RWR worked very well, detecting the target early on and providing an excellent azimuth. Antiaircraft ambush may be possible using the accuracy of the RWR's azimuth-finding technique*, though this tactic is not wise. U-180 dove to 25 metres in plenty of time to evade the RAF aircraft. Numerous wabos dropped on enemy's last datum of U-180, more than 200 metres astern of the boat. Periscope check before resurfacing showed twin-engine aircraft disappearing into the distance. Waited two more hours before resurfacing at 19h50.

Entry III:
27 March 1943. 08h50. GH54.
At roughly 07h00, U-180 encountered a single English merchantman on the horizon bearing 057, course north-west, range approximately 17.5 kilometres. This distance was very rapidly closed on the surface, the intent being to attack with the deck gun so as to conserve torpedoes, resulting in the enemy opening fire at a range of 9000 metres with one naval rifle of unknown calibre located in "A" position on the vessel. Some salvoes were quite accurate, efficiently bracketing U-180, though no hits were scored. It seems a handful of near misses was the best the merchant crew could manage; though the Kaleun refused to make it easy for the enemy gunners by running a straight course. Fire was opened from 105mm gun at 4000 metres, aiming for waterline. At 2500 metres, the enemy's gun was knocked out of action with one round. Shortly thereafter the target caught fire from bowsprit to fantail and began sinking on an even keel. 36 rounds expended total. Only three rounds missed. Matrosengefreiters K. Zorn, H. Balke, and H. Schubert are to be commended for excellent gunnery. Estimated 8575 GRT added to logbook. Estimate twelve survivors. Water provided, their location radioed 'in the clear' on international aid frequencies.** Best of luck to them. H. Schubert is recommended for the Iron Cross (1 Klasse) for his achievement in knocking out the enemy's gun with a single round while under intense enemy fire.

--

* - Modern RWRs cannot provide such a fine azimuth without multiple readings and networking of the RWRs in order to provide triangulation on the emitting source. However, I have no desire for GWX to fix this, though if they were going to a 15-degree or even thirty-degree fuzzy arc replacing the thick black line pointing in the direction of the emitter would be accurate to the era.

** - I have the excellent lifeboat mod installed. I sometimes feel bad for sinking my countrymen flying under the Red Ensign, particularly if I have cause to think they're Canadian, and therefore will surface and sail past survivors to "render assistance" if the tactical situation permits. I simulate the assistance calls by sending a radio report to BdU; I understand the AI has excellent radio direction finding capabilities, which means that quite realistically I then "sprint" away from the contact site and be on the alert for enemy aircraft thereafter. Though, the long-living crews are always on the alert for maritime patrol birds.

I like your form.....:yeah:.....

AndyW 06-24-09 03:29 PM

U-200 reporting in
 
"Monsoon"-boat U-200 OLtn. z. See Heinrich Schonder, enroute from Lorient to Penang in a Type IXD2 boat, is transmitting via wireless system INDIA:

2235 21 SEPT 1943
TO: BDU
GRID MP92
REACHED ASSIGNED PATROL AREA SOUTH OF CAPE GUARDAFUI / GULF OF OMAN AFTER 86 DAYS AT SEA. WILL PATROL IN THIS AREA FOR SOUTHBOUND ENEMY TRAFFIC
FUEL 45% 21 EELS LEFT
WX: MONSOON, CLEAR, GOOD VIZ, WIND 15 MS EAST
U-SCHONDER

(Today U-200 would have some busy times clearing off this area from Pirates ;))

Cheers,

Sockeye 06-25-09 12:33 AM

Currently U-Sockeye is patrolling the western approach to the North Channel in October 1944. Submerged since leaving Trondheim, we arrived in AM53 after 16-days of transit. Patrol activity was sporadic north of the Shetlands, Orkneys and Hebrides.

Second day in the area: bagged an 8200-ton ore carrier headed eastwards through AM5343 in medium-heavy seas. Our approach was cut short by the appearance of a high-speed screw to the southeast, and by the time we heard our victim's boilers brewing up and her hull scraping the seafloor, at least one aircraft was poking around astern of us. Shortly after the aerial bomb explosions, sound picked up four more high-speed contacts approaching respectively from the north and south, northwest and southwest, along with the original southeastern contact.

Neatly avoided all at 250ft/75m, but by the time we were able to raise the snorkel, battery reserves were somewhere less than 25-percent and carbon dioxide was in the red. Two separate patrols interrupted our recharge; the first a single vessel, and the second a three-ship team.

A full can now, so will see what the morning brings.

:salute:

DaveU186 06-25-09 10:50 AM

On 5th patrol in my XXI. February 1940. Plagued by bad weather and heavy seas, only sinking a medium cargo before reaching our patrol grid, BE37.

Just picked up a small outward convoy coming through the area though, only one escort (or so I think), approach on the surface and fire at an ore carrier. First torp hits but second overruns. About two minutes lates, torpedo impact!

Ore carrier doesn't seem to have taken another hit. :hmmm:

Looked beyond it, and there's HMS Rodney, stationary, after my stray torp has apparently managed to stop here dead in the water.

====================

I'm going to take the dog for a walk, but when I get back, it's the end for Rodney.

What a plonker. ;)

meduza 06-25-09 01:56 PM

The Bdu regrets to inform you that the contact with U-371 has been lost. The last transmission from U-371 was received on February 14th 1943, when Kapitanleutnant Johann Schwarz reported successful convoy attack during which he sank 44,000t HMT Aquitania. He also reported that he is preparing for another attack.

U-371 is presumed lost with all hands.

nikbear 06-25-09 06:58 PM

Bugger :wah::nope::cry: The crew of U-98 will avenge the loss of they're comrades on U-371:rock::arrgh!:

Pohl 06-25-09 08:43 PM

A Bright career ahead of me, raided a French port and found not 1 but 2 Large Troop ships for 24k tons each and 1 troop ship (8k tons) plus some small & medium merchants, on my way back to port I found a Large Merchant and some ASW Trawler scorting him, 4 torpedoes launched, 1 missed the scort other hit, on merchant both hit making it sink after 8-10 minutes of struggle.
http://i626.photobucket.com/albums/t...n/patrol-1.png

grislyatoms 06-26-09 10:22 AM

Finished my first GWX patrol, 40,000 tons.

Picked up most of my targets in the English Channel and a couple more at the Channel mouth (between Land’s End and Brest).

Went the long way around back home up around the Shetlands, two stern torpedoes left but no chance to hit anything with the wind kicking up 15 m/s. Weather absolutely crappy from the Irish Coast all the way home to Wilhelmshaven. Even spent a couple of days off Hartlepool hoping for the weather to change but alas, no.

Starting my 2nd patrol and I seem to be heading for the Channel again. Risky, I know. Just scored a nice ore carrier.

WilyPete 06-26-09 11:40 AM

This is the Kalion (sp?) of U-3. It is the 21st of September 1939 and we are near our patrol sector off Bergen, Norway. We just stayed up all night chasing a darkened ship which turned out to be a small German merchant. He was very small...just 5 foot 3. The sonar operator has an annoying, squeeky voice. :yeah:

RoaldLarsen 06-26-09 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WilyPete (Post 1124128)
This is the Kalion (sp?)

It's Kaleun - a contraction of Kapitšnleutnant.

WilyPete 06-26-09 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoaldLarsen (Post 1124255)
It's Kaleun - a contraction of Kapitšnleutnant.

Close... :yeah:


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