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frau kaleun 09-19-2010 03:14 PM

Well, grid AM53 turned out to be just as much as fun as I'd hoped. :stare: :O:

Managed to sink one smallish freighter there, lol, but aside from that... the only other merchant we got a visual on may have seen us as well and reported our position because we soon found ourselves under attack by a lone destroyer while trying to take up a parallel course outside of visual range in order to overtake her.

Our only other sightings in our initial patrol grid were also destroyers, two of whom also graced us with enough of their loving attention to keep us running silent and as deep as possible for much of our time there. Thankfully "as deep as possible" turned out to be deep enough, even though 100m was about as deep as we could safely get during any of the attacks and that was pushing it.

If nothing else, ordering a crash dive and then leveling off at 70m with <5m of water left beneath the keel and a pesky Tribal class revving up for a depth charge run in one's immediate vicinity certainly gets the heart pumping!

But I must say, the ASW tactics we encountered seemed fairly lackluster; never more than one DD on us at a time, and after 2-3 attack runs they all seemed to lose interest and move on, or lose track of us entirely judging by all the ashcans exploding further and further astern of us as we made our escape. Not that I'm complaining! :D

Only once did they get near enough to cause any damage, and that was the one time when we were in water just deep enough to get the repairs done and still stay clear of additional punishment until going silent again. :yeah:

I took some shots at the DDs when I had decent position and range before getting detected and/or going deep, but if any of them hit at all they were duds or else the Tommies saw them coming and their evasive maneuvers proved more effective than their subsequent attempts at destroying us. Six months ago I could run at p-depth and lure a distant DD into giving chase and then blow it out of the water with a well-timed stern shot - but not this time. They are getting smarter in that respect.

No aircraft, though! Which was kinda surprising. But we had very little clear weather while in that close, so maybe that explains it. I did expect a little love from coastal command, especially when it seemed like our position had been reported.

Our one success in AM53 was with a hydrophone contact we picked up while patrolling the western edge of the grid; a second sound contact pulled us into AM52 where we had another sucessful attack. At that point we had two eels left in the bow plus our external reserves, and since the weather seemed to be in a cooperative mood we headed further out into the Atlantic in the hopes of getting the externals transferred without undue harrassment.

No sooner had this bit of housekeeping been accomplished than we got report of a convoy heading, no doubt, for the upper Western Approaches; their reported course had them running NNW, almost directly into our path. As we turned south to find them ourselves the weather turned foul; by the time night fell and we were nearing our projected intercept point, the darkness and driving rain had cut our visual range to 2km or less.

Submerging to 40m and checking the 'phones we found we had indeed come very near the starboard edge of the advancing convoy; the lead escort was already several km north of us, the starboard screen had been well and truly penetrated without our even having tried. We got a read on the ships in the nearest column, came to periscope depth, and turned slowly into attack position.

I could barely get a visual on the ships about to cross our path, but was finally able to make out three of them - two smallish freighters and, eventually, a much larger vessel coming into view behind them. I fired one eel at the second of the small freighters, and then waited for the larger prey; that one got a spread from the last two available fore tubes. All three eels hit and detonated as I turned hard to starboard, waiting for any indication of response by the escorts and preparing to point my stern tube at the column should a parting gift be required.

The smaller target didn't require it; we'd hit something vital judging by the series of explosions that soon followed the eel's detonation. The larger vessel slowed a bit as we continued to shadow the column, and small fires could be seen here and there on deck, but aside from slight list she was still making way although turning gradually to port. Unfortunately her slow alteration in course was also bringing her right into position for the parting gift I'd been contemplating. The third eel sealed her fate.

By then the escorts had begun a slow if sure convergence towards the scene of the crime, but by the time they got within anything resembling visual range, we were diving at flank speed on a course that would put us directly underneath the rest of the convoy. We never heard so much as a ping from their ASDIC. We leveled off at 120m and went silent, listening on the 'phones as the entire flock made the turn east towards Britain and home. A couple of escorts stayed behind for short while, circling the attack location in ever-widening orbits and, once the columns were clear of the area, forlornly dropping ashcans in a section of ocean now thoroughly devoid of u-boats. When they gave up and left to rejoin the convoy we slowly returned to the surface, fired off a report to BdU, and began our own long journey home.

frau kaleun 09-19-2010 03:53 PM

The final report

U-51 2 U-Flotilla Saltzwedel
Kptlt Kurt Dennert, Commander

Patrol 8

July 16, 1940, 04:20
Departed: Wilhelmshaven
Mission Orders: Patrol grid AM53

July 21, 1940, 13:30
Grid AF75
Ship sunk: SS Uritski (Small Merchant), 2587 tons
Cargo: General Cargo
Crew/lost: 33/17

July 28, 1940, 22:03
Grid AM53
Ship sunk: SS GreenIsland (Great Lakes Freighter), 1841 tons
Cargo: Coal
Crew/lost: 26/2

July 29, 1940, 21:02
Grid AM52
Ship sunk: Q Ship HMS Edgehill (Small Freighter), 2082 tons
Crew/lost: 77/26

July 31, 1940, 22:19
Grid AM45
Ship sunk: Q Ship HMS Looe (Small Freighter), 2365 tons
Crew/lost: 76/37

July 31, 1940, 22:28
Grid AM45
Ship sunk: SS Fort Good Hope (Empire-type Freighter), 7750 tons
Cargo: General Cargo
Crew/lost: 71/33

August 9, 1940, 02:12
Arrived: Wilhelmshaven
Crew losses: 0
Ships sunk: 5
Aircraft destroyed: 0
Patrol tonnage: 16625 tons

Awards: Oberleutnant (Ing.), Hans Woiwode, Iron Cross First Class; Oberfähnrich z. See (Ing.) Ulrich Kaeding, Iron Cross Second Class.

Promotions: Leutnant z. See Hermann Schneider, to Oberleutnant z. See; Bootsmann Josef Girndt, to Stabsbootsmann; Bootsmann Fritz Hamann, to Stabsbootsmann; Matrosenobergefreiter Kurt Augat, to Matrosenhauptgefreiter; Matrosenobergefreiter Hans Ludwig, to Matrosenhauptgefreiter; Matrosengefreiter Johann Bollmann, to Matrosenobergefreiter.

Oberleutnant z. See Josef Weissenburger will be leaving U-51 in order to prepare for his own command; he has been a capable and reliable first officer and will no doubt prove equally worthy of the additional responsibility soon to be placed on his shoulders. Our newly promoted Oberleutnant z. See Hermann Schneider will now take over as 1WO, while Leutnant z. See Johannes Hutterer will begin serving as U-51's 2WO effective immediately.

Bootsmann Heinrich Kern and Matrosenhauptgefreiter Ernst Mai have also departed our ranks to receive additional technical training. Already posted to serve aboard U-51 are Oberfähnrich z. See Peter Hollbach and Bootsmann Gerhard Lehmann, who will begin their respective duties immediately and join us on our next patrol.

JEuler 09-22-2010 08:39 AM

Hit a mine
 
Oberl. z.S. Fritz Wittmann and all the crew of the U-14 is lost on 11.April.1940. in the North Sea,area AN55,probably lost to a mine.

After some bad luck,almost sunk by depth charges from a trawler on the first patrol,the things turn for the better and sunk HMS Liverpool (light cruiser) on 4th patrol.On the 6th (last) patrol,en route to the patrol area,around Helgoland saw the German fleet heading for Norway.What a beautiful sight,10 destroyers and two battleships going at high speed.Later when reached the patrol area the weather turn bad,heavy rain and fog.I decided to wait submerged in the deep waters outside Hartlepool,and there i get the death screen.First I had no idea what happened and stared the screen for minutes,when suddenly realized that it was probably a mine.I know that the east coast is heavily mined,but thought the mines are in the shallow water closer to the coast.Well,I was wrong!Opened the campaign file with the editor and there was what to see.All the time I was "dancing" on a mine field :nope:

It's time to start a new career.

P.S. It's the first time I lost a boat this way,but I'm not angry.I try to play as realistic as possible,and this was quite realistic.In RL many U-boat was lost to a mine.

PhantomLord 09-22-2010 08:51 AM

To: BdU
From: U-128
January, 21, 1942

reached patrol grid DB99 X sunk a Liberty-Ship 8000 tons X weather heavy storm, rain, heavy fog X big tanker in sight, approximately 10.000 tons X lively ship traffic in both directions, single merchants X no defense, no planes, no escorts X

Kapt Z 09-22-2010 08:17 PM

Position report from U-53.....

07Apr41
Grid BE95
4 days out of St Nazaire on 10th patrol enroute to assigned grid DT26

No enemy traffic encountered.

Weather- clear, no precip., light seas.

Heydemann

Arael 09-23-2010 10:15 PM

September 5th, 1939.

U-11 is returning to Kiel after patrolling AN-87. On September 3, around 22:00 hours, a C2 cargo was picked up on the hydrophones in grid AN-79. Despite bad weather, we were able to get into near-perfect position, 500 meters away. While plotting the shot, it was noticed that the ship was French. Paying heed to orders to avoid shooting French ships except in self-defense, the captain defended himself from the giant ship menacingly bearing down on his tiny coastal sub. Launched 2 torpedoes, one towards the bow, one towards the smokestack. The smokestack detonated, but the other failed to detonate. Quickly fired the third torpedo, which blew a hole in the number 1 cargo hold. Ship sunk in approximately 15 minutes.

Headed North, where because of the bad weather we nearly ran into a large merchant before noticing it. Amazingly, the merchant did not notice us 300 meters off their starboard side. Heading just out of visual range, we raced North to head off the ship and get into position. Getting into position, I began plotting a solution when I noticed that the crew hadn't bothered reloading the torpedoes in the 5 hours since we last launched. Telling them to get to work, I surfaced the ship and began running North again. Unfortunately, the Merchant spotted us and began weaving. After running North for 40 minutes, we submerged to take a hydrophone fix and get into position. Whereupon I noticed that the crew STILL hadn't gotten around to the torpedoes. After going forward and putting the fear of God into them, I surfaced again and ran North ahead of the merchant. This time, the worthless morons loaded the torpedoes, so I dived and got into position. Used a pair of steam-powered torpedoes from 450 meters, set for magnetic detonation under the keel. Despite the merchant's evasive maneuvers, I was able to put one torpedo under the forward cargo holds. The other one ran a hair too shallow and bounced off the hull. Ship sank in around 10 minutes, but had called in a destroyer. Managed to get away after about 30 minutes. Surfaced, and started heading home. Currently off the coast of the Netherlands.

Snestorm 09-24-2010 01:57 AM

U64 IXB. Patrol 8 completed.
 
Homeport: Lorient (2. Flotilla)
Patrol Dates: 17.JAN.42 - 3.APR.42

Proceeded southward along the african coast, thence westward into The Carribean Sea.

2 merchants sunk for 15.147 GRT.
Encounter much naval activity in the area north of Port Of Spain.
Operated submerged by day, and surfaced by night.

On 25.FEB42 in ED94 a destroyer responded to our attack on a T2 Tanker. Thereafter aircraft were seen through the observation scope.

On 26.FEB.42 we were forced to dive by a destroyer, who followed up with several DC attacks. Some minor damage was taken, and repairs were conducted.

On 3.MAR.42 during our return trip we were surprised on the the surface, at night, by aircraft. We took no damage, but a change in our routine became neccesary. (This is not a good thing). It was also decided to return to Lorient by a much more northerly route.

On 30.MAR.42 we encountered and came under attack by a lone destroyer. He inflicted damage during his attacks, including the destruction of our starboard diesel, and radio antenna. Upon surfacing, hours llater, in heavy fog, we discovered that we could recharge what little energy had been consumed by the batteries, but it took 4½ hours.
Full ahead for Lorient at 11 knots, hoping the weather would hold and protect us.
We were forced to dive one more time before reaching Lorient, but our destination was near.

Patrol Results: 2 tankers sunk for 15.147 GRT
Hull Integrity: 89%

U64 record to date:
8 war patrols (29.MAR.40 - 3.APR.42).
22 merchants sunk for 121.466 GRT.

Gerald 09-24-2010 02:31 AM

121 466 GRT sounds like a lucky trip, or what it is only a euphoria
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1501063)
Homeport: Lorient (2. Flotilla)
Patrol Dates: 17.JAN.42 - 3.APR.42

Proceeded southward along the african coast, thence westward into The Carribean Sea.

2 merchants sunk for 15.147 GRT.
Encounter much naval activity in the area north of Port Of Spain.
Operated submerged by day, and surfaced by night.

On 25.FEB42 in ED94 a destroyer responded to our attack on a T2 Tanker. Thereafter aircraft were seen through the observation scope.

On 26.FEB.42 we were forced to dive by a destroyer, who followed up with several DC attacks. Some minor damage was taken, and repairs were conducted.

On 3.MAR.42 during our return trip we were surprised on the the surface, at night, by aircraft. We took no damage, but a change in our routine became neccesary. (This is not a good thing). It was also decided to return to Lorient by a much more northerly route.

On 30.MAR.42 we encountered and came under attack by a lone destroyer. He inflicted damage during his attacks, including the destruction of our starboard diesel, and radio antenna. Upon surfacing, hours llater, in heavy fog, we discovered that we could recharge what little energy had been consumed by the batteries, but it took 4½ hours.
Full ahead for Lorient at 11 knots, hoping the weather would hold and protect us.
We were forced to dive one more time before reaching Lorient, but our destination was near.

Patrol Results: 2 tankers sunk for 15.147 GRT
Hull Integrity: 89%

U64 record to date:
8 war patrols (29.MAR.40 - 3.APR.42).
22 merchants sunk for 121.466 GRT.

so there will be an evening with the crew, and free drinks,Great work!

Snestorm 09-24-2010 02:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vendor (Post 1501073)
so there will be an evening with the crew, and free drinks,Great work!

121.466 GRT is the whole carreer's tonage to date. (2 years work in 8 patrols).
This patrol was just 15.147 GRT (2½ months).
Do we still get free drinks?

Gerald 09-24-2010 03:06 AM

Everything has its price,
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Snestorm (Post 1501089)
121.466 GRT is the whole carreer's tonage to date. (2 years work in 8 patrols).
This patrol was just 15.147 GRT (2½ months).
Do we still get free drinks?

I'll put a good word for you and the crew, but the BDU expects one more then we discloses a IX boat to you, but a few bananas from Africa, we can arrange.

Snestorm 09-24-2010 03:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vendor (Post 1501091)
I'll put a good word for you and the crew, but the BDU expects one more then we discloses a IX boat to you, but a few bananas from Africa, we can arrange.

Already have my IXB.
I try to keep it historical, so my scores are coming out fairly historical.
If that stops happening, I'll have to add more to make it harder.
Bananas? Sounds like a good deal. Gladly accepted.

pickinthebanjo 09-24-2010 05:36 PM

I havn't seen this thread in a while, guess I've been busy

desirableroasted 09-24-2010 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arael (Post 1501006)
September 5th, 1939.

While plotting the shot, it was noticed that the ship was French. Paying heed to orders to avoid shooting French ships except in self-defense, the captain defended himself from the giant ship menacingly bearing down on his tiny coastal sub. Launched 2 torpedoes.....

Hilarious. Did you ever read The Caine Mutiny? It has a great passage about using the passive voice to deflect blame ... I was in the Navy and can vouch that it works (all too often).

desirableroasted 09-24-2010 06:51 PM

Helmut Ferro, Kapitanleutnant
 
Kapitanleutnant Helmut Ferro

Career to date: 01 Aug 1939 - 14 Feb 1941, U-48, a VIIB with the 2nd Flotilla out of Wilhelmshaven and Lorient.

15 patrols, 354 days at sea (some post-refit patrols out of Las Palmas and Cadiz).
Merchant tonnage: 66 ships for 370K
Warships: 1 for 48K (HMS Hood)

Worst dry spell: Patrols 9 and 10, 29 days in all, 2 ships sunk for 4400 tons.
Best streak: Patrols 6-8, 57 days, 20 ships, 110,000 tons.
Patrol to remember: No. 15, 7 days, 9 ships, 40K tons, and blown nearly to pieces in clear weather by a lucky plane.

Latest bling: KC with golden oak leaves, swords and diamonds, though a closer look reveals the "diamonds" are just cubic zirconium.

Six officers sent on to their own U-boat commands.

Rules of thumb: We sink only merchants. We sink warships only when we must in self-defense or when the propaganda value makes it worthwhile. We never engage aircraft unless we cannot clear our decks.

74%/84% reality (I have not yet fully mastered full manual targeting, and I sometimes like the joy of the external camera (but never tactically)). Otherwise, I play as realistically as I can: no "xray vision lock," realistic torp spares loading, no on-the-fly "impact" to "magnetic" switches, no torpedo loading or handling in rough weather or under fire, etc. Dead is dead, and retired is retired.

GWX 3 and most of those included mods, SH3 Commander.

VONHARRIS 09-25-2010 11:52 AM

I am still alive.
The BdU is trying to get rid of me.
I have to reach patrol grid GR55 that is South Africa Cape of good hope.
I had a very curious contact : A Gato class submarine just when I have cleared Lorient. I sunk him with a G7a torpedo and called it in.
At this point I am sailing on the surface east of the Kanarie Islands with perfect weather. It is January 1943
No other contacts!
U - 126 will return
(U-126 IXC)


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